Structural Pest Inspections - Peeling The Onion
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Structural Pest Inspections - Peeling The Onion authorStructural Pest Inspections - Peeling The Onion
by Ron W. Ringen of Ringen's Unbiased Inspections
07-02-2004

Wood pests, wood destroying organisms, structural pests, termites and dryrot, or fungus, whatever or however you refer to them, they are the uninvited unwanted guests that can degrade the wood structure of your home or the home you are interested in purchasing. What is interesting is how these conditions are addressed in the various states.

Some states allow home inspectors to identify and report on these issues if the inspector is properly certified or licensed. Meanwhile, other states (California is one) do not allow home inspectors to identify wood destroying organisms unless that inspector is also licensed as a structural pest inspector, of which there are very few. But, if the inspector is properly licensed, then the reporting will be done on a report form mandated by the Structural Pest Control Board located in Sacramento and the reporting process falls under a whole slew of regulations administered by the Structural Pest Control Board. In California a home inspector can only mention a “wood pest” or “white growth” condition and note it in his or her report, and then, can only refer/defer to a licensed Structural Pest Inspector or company for further details, proper identification of the wood pests involved, and recommendations necessary to correct or repair the issues present.

This practice is unfortunate as that process breeds (in California anyway) a huge conflict of interest situation that revolves around the home sale or purchase activity. In California, the Structural Pest Companies perform the “termite” inspections (the term commonly used to describe a Structural Pest Inspection) for little or no money with the intent of getting their “foot in the door” to do the chemical treatments and repair jobs, which can be very expensive. So, lets peal off the first layer of the onion. The scenario goes: The inspector/company you call to make the inspection is the same person who provides you with a report that outlines the repairs and chemical treatments that he/she says are needed, which is the same person shoving a pen and a work contract into your hands to sign, which is the same person/company that sends out their repair crew to perform the work, which is the same person/company that “inspects” the completed work and then issues a Notice of Completion and certifies the property “free and clear”. I don’t know about you, but in my opinion, that is a big conflict of interest.

But wait, lets take it one more step. Lets peal off the next layer of the onion. How about the fact that many of the “termite” companies pay their inspectors straight commission on WORK PERFORMED/COMPLETED! Might that smack of a little conflict of interest? How comfortable would you feel having your home inspected under those conditions? How objective and impartial do you feel the outcome of the “termite” report will be, knowing that the “termite” company/inspector lost money the moment the tailgate of the inspectors’ truck went through the shop gate on the way to the inspection and now they need to recoup?

Time to peal the next layer off of the onion (are your eyes watering yet?). Now lets throw the real estate agent into the mix. The agent calls the “termite” company for his client (purchaser) and orders the inspection. All fine and good unless this agent happens to be one of those who has a predetermined idea as to what the outcome of the inspection should be in order to close the deal quickly and with no hassles even though the inspection report may have no basis of reality as to the conditions present. This is why, on occasions too numerous to count, two inspections of the same home are worlds apart. The rule is: both/all reports of the same home should contain the same findings, but the recommendations to repair may differ as inspectors may have different methods to correct the conditions found. It is very disturbing when comparing two reports of the same home, that, the diagram, as well as the findings, is as if the two inspectors looked at two different homes. But, this occurs all too often because of the pressure applied by the agents by “black balling” inspectors that are perceived to be “deal busters” because they actually do their job and accurately report conditions present. Please don’t feel that this discussion is saying that all real estate agents or termite inspectors/companies are “shady”. More are good than bad, but the questionable still exist and you need to be aware and do “your home work” so you don’t end up in a situation you didn’t bargain for.

So, lets peal another layer off of that onion, but in a positive way this time. ALWAYS, I REPEAT, ALWAYS interview the real estate agent before engaging them. Just because the agent meets you at the door of the office doesn’t mean you are “stuck” with him/her. If the agent is the listing agent of the property, be especially wary. They will not legally be working for you or have your best interest at heart. That is where the questionable termite inspector/company may suddenly appear. You want to ask the hard questions and get the proper answers! You want to know names and phone numbers---- not of sellers, but of purchasers of property handled by the agent so you can find out how their (the purchaser) experience was. Of course, this is a good time to find out how satisfied they were with the pest work that was performed. You would be surprised how many buyers are very unhappy with the quality/completeness of the pest repair work but don’t have the stamina to “fight the system”.

In closing, referrals from qualified sources is your best way to find the inspector and real estate agent that will best serve you. Remember, the ones charging the least are most likely the ones to give you the least. A home purchase is probably the single largest investment any of us will make in our lifetime, don’t shortchange yourself by falling into the age-old trap of the “cheapest”.


Ron Ringen owns and operates Ringen’s Unbiased Inspections, which is located in Sonora, California. Ringen’s Unbiased Inspections serves the beautiful gold country of California that includes the foothills and Sierra Mountains in the counties of Tuolumne, Calaveras and Amadore. Ron has been involved with the Structural Pest Control business for 41 years and has been a licensed Structural Pest Inspector in California since 1968. Ron is a licensed General Contractor (B) in California and has been since 1978. Ron is certified with the American Institute of Inspectors as a Home Inspector, Manufactured/Modular Home Inspector and a Pool and Spa Inspector. Visit his company website at www.unbiasedinspections.com, send him an E-mail, or call his office at (209) 533-5044 for more information.

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